What do your Country Risk Indicators mean?

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Trading Economics: A Guide to Economic Statistics for Practitioners and StudentsAn important part of a country risk analysis is the assessment of the economic indicators of a country. How are these indicators defined? What is their connection with country risk? When is a value considered risky?

The book “Trading Economics: A Guide to Economic Statistics for Practitioners and Students” by Trevor Williams and Victoria Turton could be helpful with interpreting indicators. It has chapters on economic growth, the labour market and inflation. It further discusses indicators that refer to fiscal policy, monetary policy and the foreign trade position of countries.

The book is particularly about the first question and financial market analysis. If you are interested in answers to the second and third answer (i.e. interpreting indicators as a country risk analyst), please have a look at the posts below.

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2 thoughts on “What do your Country Risk Indicators mean?

  • 2014 (October) at 22:40
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    I am really looking forward to the new GeoMeans blog series on “Getting Started with CRA”. Your articles are always well-informed, succinct and relevant; thank you for so generously sharing your knowledge and expertise Leonhardt.

    In a related topic, I note that the Executive Summary of this report I recently came across:

    http://www.escwa.un.org/information/publications/edit/upload/E_ESCWA_SD_13_10_E.pdf

    gives a useful and refreshingly simple layman’s explanation of the value and practical application of short-term economic indicators.

    I have certainly found short-term indicators to be helpful when assessing and making sense of events in fast-changing regions.

    Thank you, and please keep up the great work.

    Reply
    • 2014 (October) at 22:10
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      Many thanks for your suggestion, David. I will discuss the source in one of the next posts of the “Getting Started” series.

      Reply

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